Evidence briefs

8 results

How can we overcome issues of access to digital learning for primary school learners with disabilities in LMICs during Covid-19?

In these times of COVID- 19, issues of access to digital learning for primary school learners in low and middle income countries (LMICs) has gained much attention. Primary school learners with disabilities in LMICs are most likely to face barriers to accessing digital learning or least likely to benefit from it. These barriers to education contribute to the increased risk of poverty for people with disabilities. Digital learning (Educational technology) offers the potential to enable continuing education generally for LMICs in the response to school closures and beyond it. Some LMICs have put in place measures to ensure learning continues by introducing virtual learning platforms and e-learning resources across all the levels of education, and as well organising lessons on television and radio. As LMICs work to make digital learning more accessible to all, this brief reports on evidence based approaches to promoting the inclusion of primary school learners with disabilities.

  • Education
SignificanceFeasibilityApplicabilityEquity
Recommendations
  • The content of digital learning resources should be relevant to the diverse needs of primary school learners with disabilities in LMICs.
  • Data connectivity and affordability should be improved for primary school learners with disabilities in LMICs.
  • Introduce clear guidelines for coordinating disability-inclusive digital learning in primary schools using multiple delivery channels.
  • Invest in research on access to and the effectiveness of blended learning (digital instructions and non-digital packages) for primary school learners with disabilities.

What works to eliminate stigma as a barrier to educational outcomes for children and youth with disabilities?

To improve educational outcomes for children and youth with disabilities, barriers to inclusion need to be addressed. Experiences of stigma represent a significant and common barrier facing children and youth with disabilities and this may vary by type and severity of disability. Stigmatisation is a societal process found within communities at individual, interpersonal, organisational, social and institutional levels. Information on approaches to, as well as impact of interventions that address stigma in the context of children and youth with disability in LMIC is generally lacking. The widespread detrimental consequences of stigma related to disability highlight the need for interventions aimed at reducing this stigma. This brief aims to summarise the stigma-reduction interventions (that either reduce or prevent stigma) relating to disability that improve educational outcomes for children and youth with disabilities in LMIC.

  • Education
  • Stigma
SignificanceFeasibilityApplicabilityEquity
Recommendations
  • Active involvement of children and youth with disabilities and caregivers in the development, delivery and testing of stigma-reduction interventions
  • Multi-level and evidence-based stigma-reduction interventions in LMIC addressing a wide variety of stigma need to be developed.
  • Stronger evaluation of promising multi-level stigma-reduction interventions adapted towards children and youth with disabilities in LMICs.
  • Educators to be trained in the detection and delivery of appropriate stigma-reduction intervention strategies for children and youth with disabilities.

Remaining questions

There are no remaining questions related to this theme